Tag: Case study

Can communication restore lost faith?

October 9th, 2014   •   no comments   
Can communication restore lost faith?

 After a two-week strike by pilots that left both passengers and crew on the tarmac, Air France KLM is fighting hard to regain lost ground. But in the long haul, it will take more than a letter of apology to win back customers

I’ve been flying between France and Canada for over twenty years. We usually travel back to Toronto at least once a year to visit family and friends. Several years ago we decided not to fly Air France anymore – it’s just too risky.

I’m not talking about safety – although the article in the October 2014 edition of Vanity Fair on the ill-fated flight from Rio to Paris isn’t exactly reassuring. The fact is Air France is just as safe as any of the world’s major airlines. And statistically, air travel is still the safest form of transportation.

It’s the risk of a strike that holds us back. Especially as we often travel around Christmas or during the summer holidays: prime strike season in France. And we are not alone in avoiding the national airline, especially since the latest round of cancellations.

It’s one thing to lose your luggage, even keep you waiting. Passengers are fairly understanding of delays caused by technical problems. It’s all in how it’s handled. And that almost always comes down to communication. read more

Message from the White House

October 10th, 2013   •   no comments   
Message from the White House

As a communication professional I admire good PR regardless of creed or politics. So I’ve decided to share a letter that the Obama White House issued to address the government shutdown with U.S. federal employees. Simply because it provides, in my opinion, an example of good PR writing.

Why? Because it begins with an understanding of audience. Continues with an emphasis on the 3 most important letters in PR (“y-o-u”). Because it tells the truth (or contains factual information). Because it is true to its brand, with core messages throughout. Along with ample amounts of the secret ingredient of all good communication: emotion. read more